Bill Gates

William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is a co-founder of Microsoft and is an American business magnate, investor, author and philanthropist. In 1975, Gates and Paul Allen launched Microsoft, which became the world’s largest PC software company. During his career at Microsoft, Gates held the positions of chairman, CEO and chief software architect, while also being the largest individual shareholder until May 2014. Gates stepped down as chief executive officer of Microsoft in January 2000, but he remained as chairman and created the position of chief software architect for himself. In June 2006, Gates announced that he would be transitioning from full-time work at Microsoft to part-time work and full-time work at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He gradually transferred his duties to Ray Ozzie and Craig Mundie. He stepped down as chairman of Microsoft in February 2014 and assumed a new post as technology adviser to support the newly appointed CEO Satya Nadella. Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. He has been criticized for his business tactics, which have been considered anti-competitive. This opinion has been upheld by numerous court rulings. Later in his career, Gates pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors. He donated large amounts of money to various charitable organizations and scientific research programs through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which was established in 2000. Since 1987, Gates has been included in the Forbes list of the world’s wealthiest people. As of July 2017, he is the richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of US$89.9 billion. In 2009, Gates and Warren Buffett founded The Giving Pledge, whereby they and other billionaires pledge to give at least half of their wealth to philanthropy. [Excerpt from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ]

Below are some of his business Inspiration

Microsoft is not about greed. It’s about innovation and fairness.

I am results-oriented.

If you can’t make it good, at least make it look good.

In ninth grade, I came up with a new form of rebellion. I hadn’t been getting good grades, but I decided to get all A’s without taking a book home. I didn’t go to math class, because I knew enough and had read ahead, and I placed within the top 10 people in the nation on an aptitude exam.

I really had a lot of dreams when I was a kid, and I think a great deal of that grew out of the fact that I had a chance to read a lot.

Whether I’m at the office, at home, or on the road, I always have a stack of books I’m looking forward to reading.

Like my friend Warren Buffett, I feel particularly lucky to do something every day that I love to do. He calls it ‘tap-dancing to work.’

I never took a day off in my twenties. Not one. And I’m still fanatical, but now I’m a little less fanatical.

At Microsoft there are lots of brilliant ideas but the image is that they all come from the top – I’m afraid that’s not quite right.

Everyone needs a coach. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a basketball player, a tennis player, a gymnast or a bridge player.

I would counsel people to go to college, because it’s one of the best times in your life in terms of who you meet and develop a broad set of intellectual skills.

I’ve always been interested in science – one of my favourite books is James Watson’s ‘Molecular Biology of the Gene.’

Some people, through luck and skill, end up with a lot of assets. If you’re good at kicking a ball, writing software, investing in stocks, it pays extremely well.

When Paul Allen and I started Microsoft over 30 years ago, we had big dreams about software. We had dreams about the impact it could have.

One thing I’ve always loved about the culture at Microsoft is there is nobody who is tougher on us, in terms of what we need to learn and do better, than the people in the company itself. You can walk down these halls, and they’ll tell you, ‘We need to do usability better, push this or that frontier.’

Innovation is moving at a scarily fast pace.

Of my mental cycles, I devote maybe ten percent to business thinking. Business isn’t that complicated. I wouldn’t want to put it on my business card.

In business, the idea of measuring what you are doing, picking the measurements that count like customer satisfaction and performance… you thrive on that.

Expectations are a form of first-class truth: If people believe it, it’s true.

I believe that if you show people the problems and you show them the solutions they will be moved to act.

This is a fantastic time to be entering the business world, because business is going to change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 50.

The way to be successful in the software world is to come up with breakthrough software, and so whether it’s Microsoft Office or Windows, its pushing that forward. New ideas, surprising the marketplace, so good engineering and good business are one in the same.

Who decides what’s in Windows? The customers who buy it.

The outside perception and inside perception of Microsoft are so different. The view of Microsoft inside Microsoft is always kind of an underdog thing.

Software innovation, like almost every other kind of innovation, requires the ability to collaborate and share ideas with other people, and to sit down and talk with customers and get their feedback and understand their needs.

People always fear change. People feared electricity when it was invented, didn’t they? People feared coal, they feared gas-powered engines… There will always be ignorance, and ignorance leads to fear. But with time, people will come to accept their silicon masters.

In almost every job now, people use software and work with information to enable their organisation to operate more effectively.

I was lucky to be involved and get to contribute to something that was important, which is empowering people with software.

Driving up the value of the advertising is a big commitment for Microsoft.

The quality of research in the U.S. is absolutely the best.

The mainstream is always under attack.

I don’t have a magic formula for prioritizing the world’s problems.

The idea that you encourage companies to take their innovative thinkers and think about the most needy – even beyond the market opportunities – that’s something that appropriately ought to be done.

Digital technology has several features that can make it much easier for teachers to pay special attention to all their students.

Understanding science and pushing the boundaries of science is what makes me immensely satisfied.

The only thing I understand deeply, because in my teens I was thinking about it, and every year of my life, is software. So I’ll never be hands-on on anything except software.

Maintaining a consistent platform also helps improve product support – a significant problem in the software industry.

Although I don’t have a prescription for what others should do, I know I have been very fortunate and feel a responsibility to give back to society in a very significant way.

China has many successful entrepreneurs and business people. I hope that more people of insight will put their talents to work to improve the lives of poor people in China and around the world, and seek solutions for them.

When I was in my 40s, Microsoft was my primary activity.

Whether it’s Google or Apple or free software, we’ve got some fantastic competitors and it keeps us on our toes.

If you’ve found some way to educate yourself about engineering, stocks, or whatever it is, good employers will have some type of exam or interview and see a sample of your work.

Americans want students to get the best education possible. We want schools to prepare children to become good citizens and members of a prosperous American economy.

If all my bridge coach ever told me was that I was ‘satisfactory,’ I would have no hope of ever getting better. How would I know who was the best? How would I know what I was doing differently?

I’ve always been amazed by Da Vinci, because he worked out science on his own. He would work by drawing things and writing down his ideas. Of course, he designed all sorts of flying machines way before you could actually build something like that.

The ability of a successful company to add functionality to its product has long been upheld.

For a highly motivated learner, it’s not like knowledge is secret and somehow the Internet made it not secret. It just made knowledge easy to find. If you’re a motivated enough learner, books are pretty good.

Lectures should go from being like the family singing around the piano to high-quality concerts.

Unfortunately, the highly curious student is a small percentage of the kids.

This whole phenomenon of the computer in a library is an amazing thing.

When you revolutionize education, you’re taking the very mechanism of how people be smarter and do new things, and you’re priming the pump for so many incredible things.

Technology is unlocking the innate compassion we have for our fellow human beings.

Eventually, all companies are replaced.

I’m an investor in a number of biotech companies, partly because of my incredible enthusiasm for the great innovations they will bring.

It’s a nice reader, but there’s nothing on the iPad I look at and say, ‘Oh, I wish Microsoft had done it.’

The potential financial reward for building the ‘next Windows’ is so great that there will never be a shortage of new technologies seeking to challenge it.

There is a difference between what technology enables and what historical business practices enable.

Money has no utility to me beyond a certain point.

When a country has the skill and self-confidence to take action against its biggest problems, it makes outsiders eager to be a part of it.

A lot of people assume that creating software is purely a solitary activity where you sit in an office with the door closed all day and write lots of code.

Being flooded with information doesn’t mean we have the right information or that we’re in touch with the right people.

To create a new standard, it takes something that’s not just a little bit different; it takes something that’s really new and really captures people’s imagination, and the Macintosh, of all the machines I’ve ever seen, is the only one that meets that standard.

No one person controls Microsoft. The board and the shareholders decide whether they want to have me as CEO.

It’s possible – you can never know – that the universe exists only for me. If so, it’s sure going well for me, I must admit.

I don’t think there’s anything unique about human intelligence.

Innovation is a good thing. The human condition – put aside bioterrorism and a few footnotes – is improving because of innovation.

As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.

Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.

We all need people who will give us feedback. That’s how we improve.

Information technology and business are becoming inextricably interwoven. I don’t think anybody can talk meaningfully about one without the talking about the other.

Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.

It’s fine to celebrate success but it is more important to heed the lessons of failure.